Pen-tastic

Today’s Dblog Week topic is about tips and tricks.  There are many nuances to my diabetes management.  This injections trick is probably my favorite:

1. Download the mySugr app.

2. Log blood sugars, insulin injections, carbs, and more in mySugr.

3. If your insulin pen does not have one of those fancy calculators indicating when you last took insulin, create your own system to minimize the risk of double-dosing, or forgetting to dose.

4. For example, in the photo shown below, mySugr would have indicated that I already took 3 boluses of fast-acting Humalog today.  For my fourth shot of Humalog, I move the green hair tie up to the #4 drawn in marker on the insulin pen.  Later, when I take my fifth injection, I will move the band up to #5 on the pen.  And so on.

*If I exceed 8 boluses in one day, I simply move the hair tie back down to #1 (which becomes #9 in this case, and according to my logbook information in mySugr.)

**Handwriting was never my strong point.  Sorry, Catholic grammar school nuns!

IMG_4072

5.  Injections are a blur when your body has endured a lifetime of pokes and prods.  This system helps me to keep track of which injection I am on for this particular day.  My hope is that sharing this trick helps someone else.  Get creative with those hair ties!  🙂

 

Disclaimer: This is my own experience; consult with a medical professional before making changes to your diabetes management.

Bingo


DBlog Week topic #4 is in regards to the healthcare experience.  Yours truly could write a novella about this, but instead I will direct you to a few relevant posts.

For my healthcare rants and proposed solutions, please see here, here, and here.

Erin Gilmer’s “To All My Providers” is a must-read.

I am well-aware of the flaws of our healthcare system, having studied healthcare in grad school, worked in it, and lived it for 25 years as a type 1 diabetic.  But for some odd reason, I just don’t feel like complaining about those flaws tonight.  Instead, I want to share a vignette about the spirit of healthcare that I wish the system embodied more often.

In 2014, I took a summer elective called “Healthcare and the Older Citizen” as part of my Master’s program.  I don’t know if I can really relate to this stuff, I thought.  But the instructor was my favorite, and we got to tour nursing homes and elder care facilities all over the state of Rhode Island.  Wins all around.

The juxtaposition of two facilities has always stuck with me.  Early in the season, we toured a fancy nursing home which cost enough to afford college tuition and then some.  The food was topnotch, organic, and prepared by the best chefs in the state.  The amenities rivaled an episode of MTV Cribs.  The picturesque sunsets were the stuff dreams were made of.  By the end of the tour, my classmates and I were ready to pack our bags and move in!

The residents at Fancy Home were not particularly memorable.  Nothing bad happened, per se, but nothing great was happening, either.  They kept to themselves and spent their days dining on lobster and not talking much to their neighbors.

Later that summer, we visited a different location, a Church-run, low income assisted living facility.  This place looked like the storage shed of Fancy Home.  The cafeteria was reminiscent of my Catholic grammar school days- overcrowded and overheated.  The food was run-of-the-mill, easy mac-n-cheese or hotdogs with green beans.

But the residents at Church Home were different.  There was a noticeable pep in their step as they gave us the grand tour.  One woman opened up her apartment to our entire class, and as we crowded into the room she showed us a black-and-white photo of a relative who- despite the diagnosis of diabetes at a time predating blood glucose meters- had jetted off to explore the world.  There were no regrets in that decision.

Other residents told us about the Friday evening luaus and Saturday Bingo tournaments, and the happiness of spending one’s days winding down on earth in the company of the best friends you could ever hope to encounter.  Life was good.  Death was with dignity, surrounded by people who cared about you.  The Afterlife was even better.

My classmates and I graduated from that course with a newfound appreciation for humanity in healthcare.  We understood that no matter how much flashy technology a hospital has, or how much money is invested, you still cannot put a price on healthcare that emphasizes the “care” part.  Love, respect, and grace go a long way, and these characteristics are relatable to any walk of life, any generation, any healthcare facility.

In order to provide good quality of life, healthcare does not always require the bells and whistles.  Perhaps we have been looking in the wrong places all along.  The secret to living well has been right in front of us, on Saturday evenings, at the Bingo tournaments.

 

Words

The third DBlog Week topic, Language and Diabetes, is one that hits close to home for all of us.  Currently, I’m saving many of my thoughts on the topic in anticipation of Stanford Medicine X in September.  At MedX, I will be participating in an ePatient panel on mental health and chronic disease, and language will surely be discussed there.  We hope you will join us- whether physically at Stanford, or virtually!

In the meantime, please see here for some prior thoughts on the words we use, and how we should use them.

 

We hear you.

Many thanks to Karen Graffeo of bittersweetdiabetes.com for organizing the 7th annual diabetes blog week.  For more information about dblog week, please see here.

I am not normally one to be short on words, but this week is a bit hectic for me.  (Head nodding along to Laddie’s great explanation.)  Karen has given me permission for stress-free participation, so here it goes!  🙂

Today’s prompt is the following:

“Lets kick off the week by talking about why we are here, in the diabetes blog space. What is the most important diabetes awareness message to you? Why is that message important for you, and what are you trying to accomplish by sharing it on your blog? (Thank you, Heather Gabel, for this topic suggestion.)”

I am in the diabetes blogosphere because my life is happier being in it than being outside of it, and I hope that in my own small, empathetic way I have given back to others by being a part of the #doc.

“Dblogging” is responsible for verbs such as, well, “dblogging.”  It creates a community of passionate healthcare advocates, a place to call home when diabetes tries to turn our worlds upside down, and hope for a better future.

The #doc has led to supportive friendships both online and offline, both in our own backyards and all over the world.

BetesOnTap selfie

It is an honor and a blessing to read the deepest thoughts and the most lighthearted inside diabetes jokes that each of you shares on your blogs.  Your companionship in the carrying of the diabetes cross humbles me to my core.

Very Light, No Sugar’s words go out to the diabetic online community.  I also hope that those words somehow reach the lonely, confused diabetic kid that I once was.  I hope that someone who is not yet actively involved in the #doc knows that he or she has a place to come home to when diabetes feels like a lot to carry alone.

I blog for my own emotional well-being, for the #doc friends who are like family, and for those who do not yet have a voice or do not know where to begin.  The #doc door is always open, and I hope that you will join us if you are ready and able to do so.

It may feel like the world is not always listening, but in the diabetes blogosphere, we hear you.

New Friends on the #doc Playground

I truly enjoyed my first DBlog Week and want to again thank Karen Graffeo for organizing this for us.  One of my favorite aspects of DBlog Week was discovering blogs that I may not have been aware of prior to this week.  This seems to be the resounding theme from many of the blogs I have perused over the past seven days.  All of the reading material presented was a wonderful representation of our diverse diabetic online community, and I will always remember my inaugural DBlog Week for impressing me with the #doc spirit yet again.

I could probably shout out 100 or more posts that I loved.  Alas, my blood sugar is inconveniently crying out for food, so I am going to highlight two blogs which were new and intriguing to me this week.

In particular, I am happy to have found the blog of Frank over at type1writes.com, as well as the blog of Tamsin at type1diabeater.com.  Both Frank and Tamsin displayed contagious enthusiasm for DBlog Week, and I am so happy that our virtual paths crossed!

Thanks to all in the #doc for an enjoyable experience!  I am already looking forward to the next DBlog Week! 🙂

Favorites and Forgiving Diabetes

My favorite post is one that mostly flew under the radar:  24. P.S. I forgive you.

This post describes how I chose to forgive diabetes for the bad and to reflect on the good I have received during my 24th “diaversary.”  While it was not my most popular post of all time, it openly represents my emotions on a day that is always bittersweet.

Stephen’s short yet powerful comment on this blog post meant a lot to me, as did another I received via Facebook from the mother of a diabetic child who thanked me for writing the things that her son could not yet articulate at a young age.  Those little moments make blogging so worth it.  We can use our words to connect with and encourage others who face similar obstacles each day.  #DOC in a nutshell!

If Diabetes Were A Cinnamon Cure

 

I’m a big fan of Katy’s wit and attitude in Bigfoot Child Have Diabetes, so I wanted to stay true to her suggestion for today’s food-related theme for DBlog Week.  Alas, I am embarrassed to say that I am on the “grad school diet,” a fad that I do not endorse for full health benefits.  It amounts to guzzling coffee at all hours of the day, eating handfuls of peanuts in the car while driving to and from work/school, and scarfing down frozen dinners at 10:00 pm.  Ahh!!

Therefore, I’m playing the Diabetes Personified wild card today, but I’ll keep it food-related! 

One more disclaimer: As a former college English major, I must admit that my take on this exercise does not 100% meet the definition of personification.  Cinnamon “cures” are not people, but they do affect people’s attitudes.  So, please play along with the diabetes-cinnamon analogy here.  Mostly, I just really freakin’ wanted to write this!

If diabetes were to take the form of a cinnamon “cure” concoction that actually worked in a non-spammer world, would I pour it in my coffee and watch the Dexcom CGM line even out with each sip?

Would it fade that scar on my right lower back?  The one where the needle didn’t quite stick in all the way- so the nurse had to fiddle around with it until she could secure it with medical tape?  When she quietly asked if she was hurting me as I fidgeted under her grasp, would I still mutter “It only hurts a little bit” through clenched teeth?  Would my doctor still look on and pretend to believe me, mostly for the sake of my stubborn pride?

Would all of the needles and sleepless nights get swept away in a sea of cinnamon?

Would we inhale it like Afrezza, or tell Uncle Brad to “Pass the cinnamon, please” at Thanksgiving dinner?

Would we keep calm and bolus on?  Or would we keep calm and cinnamon?

If diabetes were a cinnamon cure, would insurance still want Prior Approval?  Would we be limited to one dab of cinnamon per month instead of the five that we might require to live healthy lives?  Would paperwork swallow us whole?

Would some people not have access to cinnamon?  Would we advocate long and hard for them?

What would the spammers say when the cinnamon cure suddenly worked for diabetes as advertised, its years of falsehood erased by a magic wand in the sky?  Would the spammers tap the Staples “That was easy!” button in unison?  Would they move on to the next groups- the cancer and the cystic fibrosis heroes?  Would they diminish the battles that these human beings face each day by promoting a “cure” so ludicrous that society rationalizes its way out of the burden of easing their pain?

“It’s your fault. You didn’t eat the cinnamon.”  And just like that the moral compass gets readjusted!

Would Wilford Brimley still say diabeetus?  Would he order a very light, extra cinnamon coffee at the drive-thru before breaking out in a dance?  Because of course he still has two functioning legs. He didn’t lose them like your grandma’s best friend’s tabby cat’s brother’s cousin did because he “failed” to “control” an autoimmune disease that doesn’t like to follow orders.  He was cured by cinnamon.  You heard it here first!

Would the #doc become the #coc- the Cinnamon Online Community?  Would we have weekly #CSMA chats?  Cinnamon Social Media Advocacy, it’s what all the cured kids are doing!

What happens to a cinnamon cure deferred?  Does its powdery dust make an audible “poof” as it dissipates?

#IWishPeopleKnewThatCinnamon is silly, mon! (Said in best Jamaican accent)

Cinnamon pleases the taste buds, not the islet cells.  If diabetes were as simple as a cinnamon cure, we wouldn’t enjoy all of the hidden blessings that we have grown to love through the complexity of managing this disease as best we can. It’s just not the same having a Kerri / Cinnamon, a Cinnamon Unconference, a @CinnamonCherise, a #dayofcinnamon Symplur hash tag, or a Cinnamon Hands Foundation- to name a few.  The real life diabetes versions of these people, organizations, and events bring far more goodness to the world than cinnamon ever will. Perhaps our virtual paths would not have crossed if silly cinnamon cures actually worked.  #Coc just doesn’t have the same ring to it as #doc, unless your mind is in the gutter!

Occasionally I sprinkle cinnamon in my coffee mug.  Then I check myself in the mirror.  It doesn’t hurt anymore, but the scar is still there on my back, a reminder of a disease that cannot be remedied by simple measures like cinnamon, a visible testament to the care I receive from others despite the pain, part of what gives us perspective and gratitude for the good days.

The needles are still required.  There will be more tears, more laughter, and more perspective gained along the way.  A sprinkle of cinnamon cannot make up for the other ingredients which have shaped our lives.  Wacky cinnamon cure theories do not do justice to the crosses we have carried.

There are no Nutrition Facts on the packaging that is life with diabetes along for the ride- not the other way around.  When we come together as a community, things are sweet enough to enjoy this #doc life for what it is without the artificial flavoring of ridiculous cure remedies.

For now, I’ll take one large coffee.  Very light, no sugar.  Hold the cinnamon, please.