In Memoriam

  • Alec Raeshawn Smith (26 years old; USA)

 

  • Shane Patrick Boyle (48 years old; USA)

 

  • Kevin Houdeshell (36 years old; USA)

 

  • Others worldwide whose names we do not know

 

 

This list honors those confirmed to have died prematurely due to healthcare inaccessibility and the high costs of obtaining insulin.  Sadly, these deaths occurred in the 21st century, at a time where cutting-edge treatments and healthcare benefits are hot topics.

We can and we must do better.

 

While I am normally shouting from the rooftops for a diabetes cure, this year feels different.  The diabetes community will never forget the names on that list, which speaks to their continued advocacy even after death.

My one ask on World Diabetes Day (WDD) 2017 is this:

Let’s not add more names to this list by the next WDD, or the next one, and so on.  The clock starts now.

 

The best memorial we can provide for those named here is to keep that list stagnant through our collective efforts.  Whether you identify as a fellow person with diabetes; someone who loves a person with diabetes; an employee of Pharma / PBM (pharmacy benefit manager) / insurance company / healthcare entity; an advocate; a non-profit leader or volunteer; an elected representative; a healthcare provider; or simply a human being with a heart, we must actively address this issue, together.

All politics aside, the only meaningful, mutually exclusive interests when it comes to insulin are life or death.  Particularly in the past year, we have encouraged a more open dialogue among many parties in the healthcare equation.  I hope that today reinvigorates us to keep moving that dial forward, toward more equitable opportunities for survival and quality of life for every person touched by diabetes.

There are many blog posts and articles out there detailing how this can be done effectively.  My little piece of WDD advocacy is not to reinvent that wheel today.  It is simply to ask us to reflect on lives lost too soon, and on so many others who fight convoluted healthcare systems all over the globe in search of insulin.

Keep saying their names.  May we hold their stories closely today, and always.

 

 

If you know of other names we can honor and remember here, please contact me to update the list.  Thank you.

 

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November, Polio, and Diabetes: A Lesson on Keeping the Faith

My grandfather was cured of polio as a child.

One summer day in high school, my friend pulled me aside at a barbecue and innocently asked, “Why does Papa have one skinny leg?”

“Polio,” was the only answer I could give.

His leg is atrophied from the polio, but the bounce in his step overrides the slight lag in his stride.  Life is good.  Family, friends, pasta, and red wine.  What more could an Italian grandpa need?

According to my relatives, Papa was blessed while riding on a parade float during the Feast of the Three Saints.  The polio disappeared after that.  I always thought that Jonas Salk played a hand in his cure, but perhaps I just really like the aspect of vagueness.  That’s where the faith is found, after all.

I will accept nothing less than a diabetes cure in my lifetime.  Plain and simple.  That faith will always be here.  When I am cured, I will hold onto that faith until every individual worldwide who is touched by diabetes receives the same renewed membership at quality of life.

Type 1 diabetes has dwelled in my body for almost 25 years.  It has undeniably left its mark.  Freckled fingertips.  Dexcom rashes.  Bruises galore.  As one friend recently joked, “You might want to leave those details out of your Tinder profile!”  Very true.

Diabetes has permanently affected my life, and yours.  I would be naïve to think that after 25 years, a cure will eradicate all of those diabetes handprints.  It won’t.  Some of the damage is already done.  But curing diabetes is also not all about me.  If I am going to be on this earth as a diabetic, if I have endured this crap for 25 years, if I know darn well how unrelenting some days are- then I cannot sit back and be okay with this in the 21st century.

We have the scientific brilliance to cure this disease.  We have the technology to cure diabetes.  And we most certainly have the motivation by which to accelerate research.  Look no further than any diabetes blog or heartfelt Facebook post by a D parent whose child just wants to eat cupcakes like the rest of the class, with no needles involved in the process.  Curing diabetes will involve faith, fundraising, advocating, and destigmatizing.  The #doc is well-suited to do this job.

It is 2015.  It’s about darn time for a cure.  I am excited about the pending technological options which will tide us over in the interim, but ultimately we need a cure.  If not for us in the here and now, then for all of the generations which will come after us.  It is our moral obligation to change this status quo.

November- diabetes awareness month- is about keeping the faith.  If my grandfather and his family had not believed that his polio would be cured- by whatever means- he may not have lived long enough to walk around the world free of leg braces, or to marry his high school sweetheart, or to still be madly in love so many years later.  He needed a cure, too.  He kept the faith, and he got the cure.

Keep the faith.  Advocate long and hard this month, and always.  #weneedacure

#BlueFridays

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My coworkers and I are hamming it up for Blue Fridays.  And no, that isn’t Sean Connery, but Manny could definitely pass for him!  Hands off, ladies!

My friends spotted Manny in blue this morning and excitedly told me to take his picture.

“What’s this all about?” he asked.

I explained how we wear blue to support diabetes awareness on Fridays, and how November is our month. Everyone within ear’s reach of the conversation thought that it was a great idea.  It is nice to see their enthusiasm for a good cause, and I am blessed to work with such supportive coworkers who I consider close friends at this point.

I am hoping to organize a “Wear Blue for Diabetes Awareness” day at work during November. If possible, I would like to email a list of a few pertinent diabetes facts out to the office so that people may understand the differences between the various types of diabetes and the need for more research. Finally, I want to personally pledge to donate $1.00 towards diabetes-related projects for each person who wears blue on the designated “blue day.”  It may not be much, but it is better than nothing.  And if people stop and really think about what it means to live in a world with diabetes, then the purpose of wearing blue and uniting to support diabetics has been accomplished in its own small way here and now.

Any creative ideas of which projects to consider? I have my own personal favorites, but I would like to learn more about any and all good diabetes research/treatment/advocacy going on, and I will take all suggestions into consideration.

Hope you all have a fantastic, healthy weekend!  Stay classy, DOC!

Wordless Wednesdays.

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Alright, if you haven’t noticed by now, I always need to add a “few” words, but this is my attempt at copying the “Wordless Wednesdays” posts that I’ve seen on some other blogs out there: 

Gearing up for Diabetes Awareness Month in November.  I have a feeling the DOC is going to make some noise next month, and rightfully so…